Euribor Will Rise In March For The Second Consecutive Month

Euribor Will Rise In March For The Second Consecutive Month

The Euribor will rise in March for the second consecutive month. The main reference rate for mortgages is -0.486%.

The 12d-month Euribor , the indicator most used in Spain to calculate mortgage payments , is heading for its second consecutive rise in March after it rebounded for the first time in February after six consecutive historical lows . Although the month has not yet closed, the average Euribor rate is provisionally at -0.486%, higher (or less negative) than the -0.501% in February, according to Bloomberg data.

In January, the indicator touched its last all-time low, at -0.505%. In December it closed at -0.497%, and in November, at -0.481%. The Euribor stopped its decline last month, just when it was five years old since it went negative , since the indicator has traded below 0% since February 2016.

This negative price has been supported by the different stimulus plans approved by the European Central Bank ( ECB ). In recent months, the drop in the indicator has been even more pronounced given the new measures adopted by the ECB to deal with the covid-19 crisis.

Looking ahead to the next few months, most experts believe that the Euribor will continue to register values ​​similar to those of today during this year and, probably, also next. Everything will depend, as they explain, on the ECB’s policy, which could change given the strong economic recovery expected after the pandemic and above all, the possible rise in inflation.

The Euribor will rise in March for the second consecutive month. The main reference rate for mortgages is -0.486%.

The 12d-month Euribor , the indicator most used in Spain to calculate mortgage payments , is heading for its second consecutive rise in March after it rebounded for the first time in February after six consecutive historical lows . Although the month has not yet closed, the average Euribor rate is provisionally at -0.486%, higher (or less negative) than the -0.501% in February, according to Bloomberg data.

In January, the indicator touched its last all-time low, at -0.505%. In December it closed at -0.497%, and in November, at -0.481%. The Euribor stopped its decline last month, just when it was five years old since it went negative , since the indicator has traded below 0% since February 2016.

This negative price has been supported by the different stimulus plans approved by the European Central Bank ( ECB ). In recent months, the drop in the indicator has been even more pronounced given the new measures adopted by the ECB to deal with the covid-19 crisis.

Looking ahead to the next few months, most experts believe that the Euribor will continue to register values ​​similar to those of today during this year and, probably, also next. Everything will depend, as they explain, on the ECB’s policy, which could change given the strong economic recovery expected after the pandemic and above all, the possible rise in inflation.

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